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December - Antifreeze

Animals Have Allergies Too!

Arthritic Nutriceuticals

Assessing Pain  

Acupuncture

Bump On Dog's Gum

Canine Influenza

Canine Seizures

Congestive Heart Failure in Dogs

Dental Health

Distemper

Exercise Intolerance & Collapse

Feline Infectious Peritonitis

Feline Leukemia

Feline Leukemia Virus

Feline Upper Respiratory Disease

Fleas

Infected Toe

Kidney Failure

Leptospirosis

Middle Ear Infections

Monkeypox

Osteoarthritis  

Palliative Measures for the Cancer Patient

Parvo

Prenatal  

Puppy Strangles

Summer Hints & Hazards

Urinary Incontinence

West Nile Virus

  

     We are pleased to introduce our new monthly feature, Ask Our Vet. Each month, Dr. Susan Neary will answer your pet questions.

     As always, we recommend that you check with your veterinarian for your pet's immediate health needs and concerns.

     Dr. Susan Marie Neary, D.V.M., graduated from Oregon State University College of Veterinary Medicine.  She also has a D.V.M. degree from Washington State University College of Veterinary Medicine in 1994 summa cum laude.

     Dr. Neary co-owns an animal and exotic practice, performing medicine, surgery, and acupuncture. 

  

 

To ask Dr. Neary a question about your pet or any other pet and animal-related topic, please email her at NtTAskOurVet@aol.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ANTIFREEZE

  

ANTIFREEZE: Sweet Taste Belies Toxicity

     Every year an estimated 10,000 pets fall victim to antifreeze poisoning. Many animals are enticed by its semi-sweet taste. A fatal dose can be as little as one ounce for 15-pound dog or one-third ounce for a cat.
     Ethylene glycol is the active ingredient in antifreeze.  It is carried in the bloodstream to the kidneys where it forms a calcium oxalate crystal inside the renal tubes. Once this occurs, the crystals are insoluble. That means there is no way to remove them from the body. The damage becomes permanent to the kidney tissue and leads to kidney failure.
     While this damage is occurring inside the animal, outward clinical signs such a depression, lethargy, groggy or drunken appearance, vomiting, and oral ulcers may help diagnose the problem. Initial signs can present themselves as early as one hour after exposure and can last up to six hours with death occurring in three to four days. Diagnosis can be difficult if the owner does not witness the pet drinking the antifreeze.
     Treatment can be expensive and require an extended hospital stay. Even if treatment is successful, there may long-term effects from the poisoning.
     Newer brands of antifreeze are using propylene glycol, which is less toxic than ethylene glycol. A bill in Congress called the ďAntifreeze Bittering Act of 2005Ē requires engine coolants and antifreezes to contain a bittering agent (denatonium benzoate) to make the products less appealing to animals.
     ASPCA National Animal Poison Control Center warns pet owners: Prevention is key to avoiding accidental ingestion of antifreeze!

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     As always, we recommend that you check with your veterinarian for your petís immediate health needs and concerns. 

     If you have questions about your petís health, care, and well-being, email your question to:

NtTAskOurVet@aol.com

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CANINE INFLUENZA

  

CANINE INFLUENZA

     Canine influenza is most likely related to the influenza viruses that affect horses which was first discovered in 1956. At some point, the virus mutated and the new strain made the leap from horses to dogs.
    The first significant natural canine influenza outbreak was diagnosed initially in 2003 at greyhound racetracks.  The first evidence of canine influenza in companion dogs was documented this spring when boarding facilities, shelters, and veterinarians submitted samples from dogs suspected of carrying the disease.
     Just because a virus jumps from one species to another does not mean humans are next.  This virus is unlike the ďfluĒ viruses humans are vaccinated for each fall. So far there is no evidence it has jumped to humans or that it will.
     All dogs are at risk. There is no vaccine for canine influenza.  All dogs are susceptible to infection by the virus and no dogs are immune. The good news is most dogs diagnosed with canine influenza experience a mild form of the disease Ė the fatality rate is very low.  Even including the most serious infections with complications the rate is between one and five percent of all dogs infected will die. Getting your veterinarian involved early and providing good supportive care is the best medicine for most animals.
     The disease begins with exposure to the virus followed by a 2 to 5 day incubation period.  After that, dogs usually suffer from a persistent cough that may last for as long as three weeks.  They may experience a yellowish nasal discharge. Dogs that experience more serious canine influenza symptoms frequently have a high fever and increased breathing rates and other indications of pneumonia.  Currently antibiotic treatment of secondary bacterial infections of the sinuses or lungs is successful in about 95% of the cases.
     You can reduce your dogís risk of exposure. The greater the exposure your dog has to other dogs, the greater the chance of infection. Currently, canine influenza appears to be an airborne infection, much like kennel cough, so direct physical contact between dogs is not required.
     To date, there have been no confirmed cases of canine influenza in Washington.

~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~ 

     As always, we recommend that you check with your veterinarian for your petís immediate health needs and concerns. 

     If you have questions about your petís health, care, and well-being, email your question to:

NtTAskOurVet@aol.com

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DISTEMPER

  

DISTEMPER

     Distemper is usually seen in rescue dogs with questionable vaccination histories. The virus attacks the mucous membranes and starts with the respiratory tract (nasal discharge, coughing, pneumonia) then moves on to
produce vomiting and diarrhea and callusing of the nose and foot pads. 
     After completing the ďmucosal phaseĒ of infection, the virus proceeds to the central nervous system for its ďneurologic phaseĒ leading to seizures, tremors, imbalance, and limb weakness. Signs may progress to death or may become non-progressive and permanent.  Recovery is also possible.
     Recovery from distemper is all about immunity and the only real treatment is supportive care while the patient amounts its own immune response.

     Prevention is easy Ė effective distemper vaccination has been available since the 1950s.

~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~ 

     As always, we recommend that you check with your veterinarian for your petís immediate health needs and concerns. 

     If you have questions about your petís health, care, and well-being, email your question to:

NtTAskOurVet@aol.com

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Feline Infectious Peritonitis

  

Feline Infectious Peritonitis

     Feline coronavirus (FCoV) disease is a subject of considerable controversy and confusion.  Feline enteric coronaviruses usually cause only mild, self-limiting diarrheic illness in young cats.  More virulent, invasive strains of feline corona virus produce the clinical disease syndrome called feline infectious peritonitis (FIP).  It is likely that it is the infection and reinfection with coronaviruses among cats (as opposed to the spread of an ďFIPĒ virus) that is responsible for the occurrence of FIP in a catí.  Any cat that carries any coronavirus is potentially at risk for developing FIP and 30% of household pet cats and 80-90% of cattery cats carry feline coronavirus.  Feline coronavirus is shed in the secretions and excretions of infected cats.  Infection is acquired from acutely infected cats by the fecal-oral, oral-oral, or oral-nasal route.
     There are two major forms of FIP.  In effusive FIP (wet form), cats usually develop progressive, nonpainful abdominal distension due to peritoneal fluid accumulation.  In non-effusive FIP (dry form), recruitment of inflammatory cells in tissues causes local necrosis and disruption of normal organ function.  There is presently no known effective treatment for FIP.  Therapy is palliative and is directed at suppressing the immune-complex component of the disease.

~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~ 

     As always, we recommend that you check with your veterinarian for your petís immediate health needs and concerns. 

     If you have questions about your petís health, care, and well-being, email your question to:

NtTAskOurVet@aol.com

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Congestive Heart Failure

  

Congestive Heart Failure in Dogs

     Congestive heart failure is usually a slow but progressive disease with two major causes in dogs. Dilated cardiomyopathy occurs in middle aged and
older large breed dogs such as Dobermans, boxers, and Great Danes. In contrast, mitral valve insufficiency is usually observed in older small breed dogs.
     Dogs with left sided heart failure usually have a difficult time breathing and they commonly cough. When listening to the chest of these dogs through a stethoscope, sounds typical of pulmonary edema (fluid in the chest) can be heard as well as a fairly severe heart murmur in the location of the mitral valve. Dogs with right sided heart failure usually have an enlarged abdomen, distended jugular veins, and sometimes a soft murmur.
     Radiographs (x-rays) are an important part of the workup of heart disease to determine the size of the heart, which is usually enlarged. Also, excessive fluid in the lungs or abdomen can also be determined. 

     Cardiac ultrasound is an excellent non-invasive method of examining the inside of the heart chambers and Doppler ultrasound can even allow the cardiologist to view the direction and speed of blood flow. Most other laboratory and blood tests are generally normal with this condition, although they are required to rule out other problems.

~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~ 

     As always, we recommend that you check with your veterinarian for your petís immediate health needs and concerns. 

     If you have questions about your petís health, care, and well-being, email your question to:

NtTAskOurVet@aol.com

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

KIDNEY FAILURE

  

KIDNEY FAILURE

Q:  If my pet is still making plenty of urine, how can there be kidney failure?

A:  In chronic kidney failure, urine is usually produced in excessive quantities.  What the kidneys are failing to do is conserve water (they are failing to make concentrated urine).  An efficient kidney can make highly concentrated urine so that a large amount of toxin can be excreted in a relatively small amount of water.  When the kidneys fail over a long time, they lose their ability to concentrate urine and more water is required to excrete the same amount of toxin.  The animal will begin to drink more and more to provide the failing kidneys with enough water.  Ultimately, the animal cannot drink enough and toxin levels begin to rise.  Weight loss, listlessness, nausea, constipation, and poor appetite become noticeable.   It is common for animals, especially cats, to have a long history of excessive water consumption when they finally come to the vetís office with one of the latter complaints.

~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~ 

     As always, we recommend that you check with your veterinarian for your petís immediate health needs and concerns. 

     If you have questions about your petís health, care, and well-being, email your question to:

NtTAskOurVet@aol.com

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SUMMER HAZARDS & HINTS

  

SUMMER HINTS & HAZARDS

     Summer is a great time to be a pet. The days are long and most kids are out of school. That leaves plenty of time for lots of attention and some serious fun!

     But summer can also be dangerous. Playing or exercising a dog in the heat can bring on a lethal case of heat stroke. Burrs, foxtails and awns from parched grasses can cause painful infections, and the chemicals we use to keep our beautiful summer yards green and control pests can poison our pets.

     Prevention is the best way to protect your pet. Always keep an eye out for potential hazards, and do your best to minimize or remove them. Keep pets cool and calm in the hottest part of the day, and check frequently for plants and insect problems. Finally, use household chemicals sparingly and according to label instructions, and store them properly and securely.

     If your best intentions arenít enough, though, you may be taking an emergency trip to your veterinarian. Anything is worth a call to the veterinarian if youíre not sure, but some things definitely require urgent attention, no matter the day or hour. Among them:

* seizure, fainting or collapse

* eye injury, no matter how mild

* vomiting or diarrhea, anything more than two or three times within an hour or so

* allergic reaction, such as swelling around the face or hives

* any suspected poisoning, including snail or rodent bait, antifreeze, or human medication

* thermal stress, a pet that has been too cold or too hot

* any wound that is open and bleeding, or any animal bite

* traumatic injury, such as being hit by a car

* breathing problems, including chronic coughing or near drowning

* straining to urinate or defecate

     Sometimes an animal may seem fine, such as a dog after being hit by a car or a cat shaken by an attacking dog with no puncture wounds. But the story inside may be quite different, with an internal injuries that need immediate veterinary attention. Any delay can cost your pet his life.

~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~ 

     As always, we recommend that you check with your veterinarian for your petís immediate health needs and concerns. 

     If you have questions about your petís health, care, and well-being, email your question to:

NtTAskOurVet@aol.com

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leptospirosis

  

Leptospirosis

     Leptospirosis is a disease is caused by spiral shaped bacteria called leptospires that are spread through the urine of infected animals. Humans and animals can become infected through contact with this contaminated urine (or other body fluids, except saliva), water, or soil. The bacteria can enter the body through skin or mucous membranes (eyes, nose, or mouth), especially if the skin is broken from a cut or scratch. Drinking contaminated water can also cause infection.

     If your pet has become infected, it most likely came into contact with leptospires in the environment or infected animals. Your pet may have been drinking, swimming, or walking through contaminated water. Because of increased development into areas that were previously rural, pets may be exposed to more wildlife, such as raccoons, skunks, squirrels, opossums, or deer that are infected with leptospirosis. Dogs also may pass the disease to each other, but this is rare.

     The time between exposure to the bacteria and development of disease is usually 5 to 14 days, but can be as short as a few days or as long as 30 days or more.

     Clinical signs of leptospirosis vary and are nonspecific. Pets may not have any symptoms. Common clinical signs reported in dogs include fever, vomiting, abdominal pain, diarrhea, refusal to eat, severe weakness and depression, stiffness, severe muscle pain, or inability to have puppies. Generally younger animals are more seriously affected than older animals. Leptospirosis is treatable with antibiotics. If an animal is treated early, it may recover more rapidly and any organ damage may be less severe. 

     The risk of getting leptospirosis from a dog in standard instances is suspected to be low. The primary mode of transmission from pets to humans is through direct or indirect contact with contaminated animal tissues, organs, or urine. Always contact your veterinarian and your physician if you have concerns about a possible exposure to an infected animal.

     As a general rule, always wash your hands after handling your pet or anything that might have your pet's excrement on it. If you are cleaning surfaces that may be contaminated or have urine from an infected pet on them, use an antibacterial cleaning solution or a solution of 1 part household bleach in 10 parts water. 

     You can prevent leptospirosis in your pet by keeping rodent problems (rats, mice, or other animal pests) under control and get your pet vaccinated against leptospirosis.

     The vaccine does not provide 100% protection. This is because there are many strains (types) and the vaccine does not provide immunity against all strains. It is important to get your pet vaccinated again even if it gets leptospirosis because it can still get infected with a different strain of leptospires.

 

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     As always, we recommend that you check with your veterinarian for your petís immediate health needs and concerns. 

     If you have questions about your petís health, care, and well-being, email your question to:

NtTAskOurVet@aol.com

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fleas

  

FLEAS

     Itís that time of year for flea control as fleas are the most common external parasite of companion animals.  Flea allergy dermatitis is the most common skin disease of dogs and cats!  Flea control has always been a challenge for veterinarians and pet owners because adult fleas cause the clinical signs, yet the majority of the flea population (eggs, larvae, and pupae) are found off the pet in and around the home.  The ideal flea control program utilizes products that target the various stages of the flea life cycle, not only the adult fleas on the pet.

     For the flea allergic patient 100% flea control is required to remain symptom free.  Even very minimal exposure may be sufficient to perpetuate itching in a hypersensitive patient (one or 2 bites per week are enough!).

     Adult fleas are only 1 to 5% of any given flea population.  Effective flea control involves treating all pets on the premises, the home if pets are inside, and the yard.  The key to treating the yard is it must be done weekly for 4 weeks to break the flea life cycle, then usually once a month for control.  If your pet comes in the house, the house must be treated with an insect growth regulator that not only kills adult fleas, but also prevents the hatching of eggs and growth in the carpet.  All bedding should be washed in hot water and pet bedding should be replaced.  Non-carpeted areas can be wet mopped to pick up flea eggs and non-cloth furniture wiped down.  Make sure the product you choose says insect growth regulator on the label.

     Next month we will deal with options for flea control on your pet.

 ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~ 

     As always, we recommend that you check with your veterinarian for your petís immediate health needs and concerns. 

     If you have questions about your petís health, care, and well-being, email your question to:

NtTAskOurVet@aol.com

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Feline Upper Respiratory Disease

  

FELINE UPPER RESPIRATORY DISEASE

     Despite the highly contagious nature of all the feline upper respiratory agents, most cats are at a very small risk for exposure. Typically infected cats come from the shelter, are outdoor cats, or are housed in closed contact with lots of other cats (experiencing crowding stress). The average housecat, who is not exposed to any rescued kittens, lives with only one or two other cats at most, and never goes outside is unlikely to break with infection.

     Ninety percent of feline upper respiratory infections are caused by either feline Herpes or feline Calicivirus Ė therefore, vaccinate your pet!  Neither of these infections is transmissible to humans. Most feline colds run a course of 7 to 10 days regardless of treatment but it is important to realize these infections are permanent and that herpes virus infections are recurring.

     A cold for a cat is usually just a nuisance but sometimes can be serious, especially if the cat stops eating or drinking. Painful ulcers can form on the eyes, nose, or in the mouth. Dehydration can result from fluid lost in the nasal discharge. Sometimes a fever is high enough to warrant monitoring; or pneumonia may result. Seek veterinary assistance if you think your cat is significantly uncomfortable.

 ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~ 

     As always, we recommend that you check with your veterinarian for your petís immediate health needs and concerns. 

     If you have questions about your petís health, care, and well-being, email your question to: NtTAskOurVet@aol.com

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dental Health

  

DENTAL HEALTH  

     How does a loving pet owner know if dental care is needed?

     Examination is the key to diagnosis and helps determine the type of treatment needed. A pet owner can help by examining their petís teeth and oral cavity at least monthly. First smell your petís breath. If you sense a disagreeable odor, gum disease may be present.  Gum problems begin when bacteria accumulates at the gumline around the tooth. Unless brushed away daily, these bacteria can destroy tooth-supporting bone, cause bleeding and if untreated, tooth loss. Usually the first sign is bad breath. Other signs you may notice are red swollen gum, tartar, or loose teeth.

     When your home exam reveals dental problems, a trip to the veterinarian is in order. Each teeth cleaning involves: (1) a general exam before anesthesia and pre-operative organ testing; (2) an oral exam under anesthesia; (3) gross calculus removal; (4) subgingival (below the gumline) scaling, root planning, and curettage where indicated; (5) tooth polishing; (6) irrigation; (7) fluoride application; (8) post cleaning exam and x-rays if needed; (9) dental charting for the medical record; (10) therapy if necessary; (11) home care instructions; (12) no-fee follow-up appointment to see how well you are performing home care.

     Dogs and cats do not have to suffer the pain and discomfort of untreated broken or loose teeth or infected gums. With the help of thorough examinations, x-rays, dental care, and daily brushing, your pet can keep its teeth in its mouth where they should be.

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     As always, we recommend that you check with your veterinarian for your petís immediate health needs and concerns. 

     If you have questions about your petís health, care, and well-being, email your question to: NtTAskOurVet@aol.com

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arthritic Nutriceuticals

  

ARTHRITIC NUTRICEUTICALS   

     Degenerative joint disease is the number one cause of chronic pain in the dog and cat.  In this summary, we will focus on some nutriceuticals, i.e., nutrients with medicinal properties. Keep in mind, these products do not produce rapid results like pharmaceuticals; one to two months are needed for them to build up adequate amounts.

Glucosamine and Chondroitin Sulfate

     These products are cartilage components harvested chiefly from sea mollusks. By taking these components orally, the patient is able to have plenty of the necessary building blocks needed to repair damaged cartilage.

Adequanģ Injections

     Adequanģ is a polysulfated glycosaminoglycan, which is also a cartilage component but is derived from the windpipe cartilage of cattle. Adequanģ has numerous beneficial effects including inhibition of harmful enzymes involving joint cartilage destruction, stimulation of cartilage repair, and increasing joint lubrication.

Omega 3 Fatty Acids

     Certain fats have been found to have anti-inflammatory properties. While primarily utilized in the treatment of itchy skin, many arthritic dogs and cats have also benefited from supplementation.

MSM

     MSM stands for methyl sulfonyl methane and represents another nutriceutical anti-inflammatory agent.  MSM is present in most plant and animal tissues and is a natural source of sulfur, however, for commercial sale MSM is derived from DMSO.

     Note:  Proper exercise is excellent physical therapy for the arthritic pet as it is crucial to maintain as much muscle mass as possible to support the abnormal joint. Massage and gentle flexion/extension of the joint may also help.

 ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~ 

     As always, we recommend that you check with your veterinarian for your petís immediate health needs and concerns. 

     If you have questions about your petís health, care, and well-being, email your question to: NtTAskOurVet@aol.com

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

OSTEOARTHRITIS    

     Preparing for your dogís labor and puppy care can be both exciting and fun; still, awareness of potential 

     Since we are now in the colder and damper season of the year, animals (and people too!) are more so experiencing the pain of degenerative joint disease.  The condition itself is the result of long-term stresses and instability of a joint either as a result of old injury or of natural development of the joint in that animal.  While surgery may be able to help in some situations, most of the time degeneration of the joint cannot be reversed and treatment focuses on preventing progression of damage.

     Numerous products are available; some are best combined with others and some cannot be combined.  Most widely used are the NSAIDS (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs).  These include aspirin, Rimadylģ Etogesicģ, Metacamģ, Zubrinģ, and Deramaxxģ.  As with people, some animals respond better to different NSAIDS.  If the effect is good, then the medication can be continued but blood testing is recommended prior to long-term use and every 6 months thereafter.

     Next month, we will delve further into some nutriceutical therapies.

~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~ 

     As always, we recommend that you check with your veterinarian for your petís immediate health needs and concerns. 

     If you have questions about your petís health, care, and well-being, email your question to: NtTAskOurVet@aol.com

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PRENATAL

  

PRENATAL   

     Preparing for your dogís labor and puppy care can be both exciting and fun; still, awareness of potential problems is of paramount importance. It is a good idea to keep track of your dogís breeding date so as to know when to expect what.

      The gestation period of the dog is considered to be 63 days with a normal range of 58 to 68 days. When your dogís due date is approaching, you should begin monitoring her rectal temperature.  When her temperature drops below 100įF (normal canine temperature 101 - 102įF), labor may be expected within 24 hours.

     During the first stage of labor, uterine contractions begin. She will appear very restless and may pace, dig, shiver, pant, or even vomit. The second stage is the hard labor stage in which the puppy is expelled. The third stage refers to the expulsion of the placenta and afterbirth.

     Puppies are born covered in membranes that must be cleaned away or the pup will suffocate.  The mother will bite and lick the membranes away. Allow her a minute or two after birth to do this; if she does not do it, and then clean the pup for her.  Simply remove the slippery covering and rub the puppy with a clean towel. The umbilical cord may be tied in a knot about one inch from the pup and cut with scissors on the far side of the knot.

     Expect one pup every 45 to 60 minutes with 10 to 30 minutes of hard straining. It is normal for a rest partway through delivery, and she may not strain at all for up to 4 hours between pups.

     Call your veterinarian if:

w 30 to 60 minutes of strong contractions occur with no puppy being produced.

w Greater than four hours pass between pups and you know there are more inside.

w She fails to go into labor within 24 hours of her temperature drop.

w She is in obvious extreme pain.

w Greater than 70 days of gestation have passed.

     It is normal for her to spike a fever in the 24 to 48 hours following birth but is NOT accompanied by clinical signs of illness.  Normal vaginal discharge after parturition should be odorless and may be green, dark red-brown or bloody and may persist in small amounts for up to 8 weeks.

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     As always, we recommend that you check with your veterinarian for your petís immediate health needs and concerns. 

     If you have questions about your petís health, care, and well-being, email your question to: NtTAskOurVet@aol.com

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

URINARY INCONTINENCE

  

URINARY INCONTINENCE   

     When a house pet develops urinary incontinence, many owners fear the worst. In reality, most cases of urinary incontinence are usually resolved with simple inexpensive medications. It is important to differentiate incontinence (involuntary urine leakage) from behavioral urinary issues (submissive urination, simple lack of housetraining, territorial marking, anxiety, or senile loss of housetraining). Animals may urinate in the house voluntarily and this is different from incontinence. 

     Most cases of incontinence are due to:

v  Infection in the urinary tract

Bladder infections are a common cause of urinary incontinence in young adult female dogs and geriatric cats. This condition is usually diagnosed by urine culture, though often signs of infections such as white blood cells or bacteria are actually visible in the urinalysis.

v  Excessive water consumption

Some animals drink so much water that their bladders simply overflow too easily. A urine specific gravity nearly the same as water, confirms excessive water consumption; in addition, blood tests may be indicated along with a urinalysis to determine the cause.

v  Weak bladder sphincter (especially common in spayed female dogs. Aging, obesity, reduced neurologic sensitivity in the sphincter and possibly other factors all contribute to this condition, which is especially common (up to one in five affected) in female dogs. Once other more serious conditions have been ruled out, the weak sphincter may be treated symptomatically with one of several medications.

     While uncommon, other causes should not entirely be counted out, e.g., spinal damage especially in the lower back, kidney infection, or an ectopic ureter.

~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~ 

     As always, we recommend that you check with your veterinarian for your petís immediate health needs and concerns. 

     If you have questions about your petís health, care, and well-being, email your question to: NtTAskOurVet@aol.com

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

MIDDLE EAR INFECTIONS  

     Otitis externa (external ear inflammation) is a common and frustrating problem that can lead to middle ear infections if not adequately treated. Identification of the cause and correct treatment of otitis externa can completely resolve clinical signs and prevent recurrence or development of more serious disease.

     Most patients present with head shaking and itchy ears and owners may be aware of the discharge and/or odor that are characteristic. The history (e.g., seasonality, age of onset, past occurrences) can be crucial in establishing primary causes and concurrent complaints may provide additional clues (e.g., salivary staining of the feet or stomach upset suggest underlying allergies).

     Every abnormal ear should be examined and treatment is based on the findings. Fungal infections (e.g., yeast) can be suggestive of underlying allergy. Bacterial infections require antibiotics consistently for 4 up to 8 weeks.  Inflammation with no infective agents indicates an allergic patient that could be helped with a topical anti-inflammatory to preclude complicating infections.

Ed Note: Dr. Neary also provides Cleaning Techniques. 

Please click HERE for more information.

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     As always, we recommend that you check with your veterinarian for your petís immediate health needs and concerns.  

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Parvo

  

PARVO INFO  

Q:  My neighborís Rottweiler puppy just recovered from parvo after many days in the hospital Ė what are the chances my dog could get this?

A:  Canine Parvovirus (commonly referred to as parvo) is an acute intestinal disease with a high death rate in unvaccinated dogs, mostly young puppies and older, immunocompromised animals. 

     The highly contagious virus is shed primarily in the feces of infected and recovering animals for 1 Ė 3 months. The shed virus persists in the environment and is resistant to most disinfectants. There is a higher risk of infection in summer and late fall. 

     It has been reported to favor certain breeds, such as Pit Bull Terriers, Rottweilers, Doberman Pinschers, and German Shepherd dogs.

     The first signs of infection include depression with a lack of appetite, followed by vomiting and often bloody diarrhea.

Since no specific antiviral therapy exists, treatment is aimed at rehydration. 

     Vaccination significantly lessens the chance of infection.  Following natural infection, recovered animals have long-lasting immunity. In fact, their blood can be used to treat sick dogs.

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     As always, we recommend that you check with your veterinarian for your petís immediate health needs and concerns.  

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ANIMALS HAVE ALLERGIES, TOO!  

  

ANIMALS HAVE ALLERGIES, TOO!  

     With an estimated 1 in 10 animals suffering from allergies, it could easily be a problem for your pet. In the allergic state, the animalís immune system overreacts to allergens to which it is exposed.

     Animals rarely cough or sneeze in response to allergens, they itch! Allergies are a year-round problem. However, you may only notice signs of allergy in your pet when pollen and mold counts are high, such as spring and fall.

     The predicted long and hearty spring allergy season this year makes it even more important to control allergen exposure.

Here are some helpful tips:

w  Medicate at the first sign of allergy. Antihistamines and fatty acid supplements (omega-3) can provide relief or significantly decrease the amount of corticosteriods needed. However, if the animalís allergy signs last longer than three months, hyposensitization treatment is recommended to avoid the damaging side-effects of corticosteriods.

w  Bathe your pet frequently.  This reduces the amount of antigen absorbed through the skin.

w  Change the air filters in your home.  Add changing the air filter on your air-conditioning unit to your list of spring time start-up maintenance.

w  Keep your windows shut.  With winter over and warm

breezes beginning to blow, many people are tempted to ďair outĒ their homes, especially from dusk to early morning. 

     Remember, these are peak pollen dispersal times and

opening the windows sends out an invitation to pollen grains looking for a place to settle!

~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~ 

     As always, we recommend that you check with your veterinarian for your petís immediate health needs and concerns.  

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FELINE LEUKEMIA VIRUS

  

FELINE LEUKEMIA VIRUS

     (Editorís Note: Taking care of pets is an important aspect of our everyday lives. Knowing when your pet is ill or in pain is just as valuable as knowing when he is happy and healthy. This month, Dr. Neary offers some guidelines to help you understand Feline Leukemia. )

 

     The Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV) causes a chronic infection that may induce cancer, immune deficiency, or bone marrow suppression.

     FeLV, though shed in all bodily secretions, is transmitted primarily via saliva (usually during grooming), bite wounds, and shared use of food and water bowls and litter boxes. The virus is shed from both ill and healthy infected cats.

     Many outcomes are possible after exposure, including recovery, latent infection (may reactivate during stress or immunosuppression), or persistent viremia (continues to shed the virus).

     Acute infection has a variety of manifestations Ė fever, depression, diarrhea, enlarged lymph nodes, and possible apparent recovery with no further signs. But, immunosuppression with secondary infections is the major cause of death associated with FeLV.

     Prevention involves vaccination of those cats at risk (outdoor cats) initially with two vaccines given 3-4 weeks apart, then with annual boosters.

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     As always, we recommend that you check with your veterinarian for your petís immediate health needs and concerns.  

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ASSESSING PAIN

  

Assessing Pain

 

     (Editorís Note:

 

     Activity Ė A general decrease in activity or a reduced response to a caregiver may be a sign of pain. Older animals tend to withdraw more than younger animals when they experience pain. Conversely, an increase in activity (characterized by restlessness or agitation) can also indicate pain.

     Appetite Ė Reduction in appetite can be associated with many medical conditions but can also be a nonspecific sign of pain.

     Elimination Ė Previously reliable pets may start to house-soil due to pain associated with accessing acceptable elimination sites or actual pain associated with elimination.

     Grooming Ė A reduction or redirection of grooming activity can be a sign of pain. If grooming is directed to a certain area of the body, this may be indicative of pain in that area. Cats that are ill or in pain may be unkempt due to a lack of proper grooming.

     Posture Ė Changes in the petís posture such as trembling, stiffening, hunched-up or a low head carriage may indicate pain. Tail wagging in a dog is not indicative of a pain-free state Ė some dogs will still wag their tail in response to human attention despite pain.

     Sleep Patterns Ė The inability to get comfortable or sleeping in an unusual posture may indicate pain. A lack of dreams (rapid-eye-movement sleep) may be a subtle sign of pain since pets may not be able to achieve that state of deep sleep.

     Vocalization Ė Whining, crying, howling, or barking may be associated with painful conditions or anxiety. Aggressive vocalization may be an attempt to repel stimuli that inflict pain. In general younger animals are more prone to excessive vocalization.  Lack of vocalization can be indicative of painful animals that are withdrawing from the environment.

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     As always, we recommend that you check with your veterinarian for your petís immediate health needs and concerns.  

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Acupuncture

  

Acupuncture

 

     (Editorís Note: Acupuncture is becoming a popular treatment option in veterinary medicine for many health situations. In addition to her many responsibilities, Dr. Neary is an acupuncture instructor.

     This month, Dr. Nearyís column is devoted to information, specifics, and answers about animal acupuncture.

 

     Recently, the ancient practice of acupuncture (a cornerstone of traditional Chinese medicine) has come under investigation by western medical research as an additional avenue of treatment.

     Acupuncture is performed by inserting small needles into specific sites (referred to as acupuncture points or points) to achieve desired effects. Stimulating these points can influence various aspects of the bodyís physiology.

     A typical session may last from 15 to 30 minutes and can include electrical stimulation of the needles. Initially, the sessions can be frequent but as treatment progresses, the sessions often become further apart or terminate completely.

     Animals, like their human counterparts, tolerate acupuncture well and may even fall asleep during the procedure.

     As with any medical therapy, there are limits to what acupuncture can achieve. The use of acupuncture (sometimes in concert with western treatments) can be used to treat a variety of conditions, some of which are listed below:

*  chronic (long-term) or acute pain from arthritis, disease, or injury

*  pain following any surgical procedures

*  organ failure (such as kidney failureĖ to increase blood flow),

*  neurological problems (such as disc disease or trauma),

*  immunologic problems

*  skin conditions

*  behavioral problems (such as cat urine spraying)

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     As always, we recommend that you check with your veterinarian for your petís immediate health needs and concerns.  

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Palliative Measures for the Cancer Patient

  

Palliative Measures for the Cancer Patient

 

     (Editorís Note: We receive may emails, faxes, and letters each month with questions about your pets. There are many questions about cancer and when is it time.

     Dr. Neary has extensive experience in oncology and has  written this monthís column to address our readersí concerns about their petís situation.)

 

     For some cancer cases, when treatment targeted at disease control is not possible or feasible and the owner is not prepared for euthanasia, patient management often turns to palliation. The goal of palliation, defined as ďpain reliefĒ, is to maintain the quality of life for as long as possible.

     Successful palliative measures allow an owner to spend more time with their pet and become more comfortable with the decision making for their terminal patient. However, palliation should not be used to prolong an animals life in situations where the quality of life is unacceptable.

     Using past experience, your veterinarian is able to recognize these situations and recommend the best course of action, based on the owners goals and expectations.

~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~ 

     As always, we recommend that you check with your veterinarian for your petís immediate health needs and concerns.  

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Infected Toe

  

Infected Toe

 

     Q: Our Golden Retriever has had an infected toe for months. The vet has had him on antibiotics and it help some but it has not healed completely. He wants to amputate the toe as he says it could be cancer. Can toe infections be associated with cancer.

- email from NtTPetInfo@aol.com

     A: It is possible, as bacterial claw infections are almost always an indicator of an underlying problem.

     If one or more claws are affected, previous trauma could be the cause. In these cases, the affected claw is often split and oozing pus. In addition, toe swelling and pain are often present. Osteomyelitis may develop as a result of chronic infection and may require claw amputation.

If many claws are affected, underlying conditions such as hypothyroidism, Cushingís disease, and autoimmune disorders must be ruled out. In these situations, fever, depression, and regional lymph node enlargement may be present.

     However, in all these cases, prognosis for claw regrowth is good if the underlying cause is identified and addressed.

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     As always, we recommend that you check with your veterinarian for your petís immediate health needs and concerns.  

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Bump on Dog's Gum

  

Bump on Dog's Gum

 

     Q: My 9 year old dog has a small bump on his gum line. It is right next to a tooth and feels hard. I have brushed his teeth but not in the last few months so I just noticed this. Could this be an abscess or something else?  He eats his food without a problem. 

I will call my vet, but it may be a few days before we can get an appointment and I am concerned.  What could this possible be?

                            - email from Sue

     A: This ďbumpĒ may be an epulis; however biopsy of the mass is diagnostic and is needed to rule out other cancerous types. An epulis is a benign tumor that arises from the periodontal connective tissue and is often located in the gum tissue near the incisors.

     Epulis is most commonly observed in geriatric dogs, but it can occur at any age.

     Because of their location, epulis are often discovered before signs develop; however, dogs may be presented for anorexia, drooling, oral bleeding, trouble breathing, and bad breath. Most types of epulides are treated with surgical excision.  Some may require radiation therapy or chemotherapy.  The prognosis is guarded to good.

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     As always, we recommend that you check with your veterinarian for your petís immediate health needs and concerns.  

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Q&A-Canine Seizures (October)

  

Canine Seizures

 

     Q: My 3-year old miniature Scottie suffered a seizure. My vet said that since the dog had not suffered head trauma nor had he gotten into poison, there was nothing to be done. He told me to watch the dog and if it happens again to call.

     He also told me that seizures are relatively common in dogs after three years of age. Is that is true because Iíve has never experienced it before with any of my other dogs.                   - Beth, Lynnwood

     A: Seizures, one of the most frequently seen neurologic disorders in dogs, have many causes. In young dogs, structural abnormalities, such as liver shunts or hydrocephalus (an abnormal amount of fluid within the brain) are a common cause of seizures. In older animals, degenerative disease or brain tumors are often the cause.

     For outdoor dogs, exposure to toxins, such as antifreeze must be considered. Epilepsy is the most common cause of seizures.  Between 2% and 3% of dogs and 0.5% of cats are diagnosed with epilepsy.

     Determining the cause of a seizure may include a physical examination, an EKG, and a basic blood profile. The results of these tests are used to rule out disorders of the heart, liver, kidneys, electrolytes, and blood sugar level.

     If the results are normal and there is no exposure to poison or history of head trauma, usually no treatment is required beyond monitoring the frequency and severity of the seizure. Those dogs that have seizures frequently enough may need continuous anticonvulsant therapy.

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     As always, we recommend that you check with your veterinarian for your petís immediate health needs and concerns.  

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

West Nile Virus

  

WEST NILE VIRUS

FACTS, TREATMENT, PREVENTION

 

     The West Nile virus was first identified in the West Nile district of Uganda in 1937, and first recognized in the United States in 1999.  

     How is West Nile Virus transmitted?   Mosquitoes draw the virus from feeding on infected birds. After 10 to 14 days, the infected mosquitoes transmit the virus contained in its saliva via bites to humans and other animals. West Nile virus is not spread from person to person nor animal to person. In areas where mosquitoes carry the virus, less than 1% are actually infected. Less than 1% of those people bitten by an infected mosquito become severely ill. Thus, the risk of contracting West Nile virus from a single mosquito bite is extremely low.

     What are the symptoms of West Nile Virus infection?

     Horses - Infected horses most commonly show hindquarter weakness manifested by a widened stance, stumbling, leaning to one side, or toe dragging; even paralysis can occur. Occasionally, horses can have a fever, be depressed, or fearful. About 1 in 10 horses infected show signs of encephalitis (inflammation of the brain), and about one-third of these horses die.

     Humans - Most people infected with West Nile virus will not show any symptoms. A minority will have very mild signs such as fever, headache, body aches, and sometimes skin rash and swollen glands. A small number of cases have been fatal and highest among the elderly.

     Other Animals - Infected wild birds are most often found dead.  West Nile virus in pets is rare, but any dog or cat showing signs of fever, incoordination, muscle weakness or spasms, paralysis, or seizures should be seen by a veterinarian.

     How is West Nile Virus treated?   No specific therapy is available for a West Nile virus infection.  Intensive supportive therapy (e.g., hospitalization, intravenous fluids, prevention of secondary infections, good nursing care) may be required. Once an animal or person is recovered, immunity to West Nile virus is life-long.

     How can a West Nile Virus infection be prevented?   A West Nile virus vaccine is available for horses. For other animals and people, reducing exposure to mosquitoes can lower the risk. Avoid areas where mosquitoes are plentiful. Avoid being outdoors between dusk and dawn during warm weather, which is peak mosquito biting time.

     Use screens on windows and doors to control mosquitoes indoors. If outdoors, wear protective clothing and use mosquito repellents on exposed skin and clothing. For pets, do not use human products that contain DEET but only those labeled safe for dogs and cats.

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Monkeypox

  

MONKEYPOX

 

     Human monkeypox is a rare viral disease occurring primarily in the tropical rain forest countries of central and west Africa. The current U.S. outbreak was caused by a large group of prairie dogs infected after contact with small mammals imported from Ghana .  Many of the U.S. cases were associated with exposure to prairie dogs through bites or handling of an ill animal (or its cage/bedding).

     In humans, the illness begins with a fever, headache, muscle aches, swollen lymph nodes, and exhaustion and lasts for 2 to 4 weeks. Within 1 to 3 days, the patient develops a blister-like rash similar to that of smallpox. Currently, there is no proven, safe treatment for monkeypox.

     To prevent infection, people should avoid contact with any prairie dogs. As always, careful hand washing is encouraged after any contact with an ill animal.

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Feline Leukemia (September)

  

Feline Leukemia

 

Q: How do cats get leukemia -- is it transmitted by anything particular?         

 - email from Stacey  

 A: Feline leukemia is spread by DIRECT contact with infected cats. It is usually transmitted via the saliva, but low levels of virus can also be found in urine and feces.

     Biting, licking, grooming and via in utero are common forms of transmission. Food and water dishes and litter boxes are likely sources of infections, if healthy cats share them with infected cats.

     Vaccination is recommended for all cats that have exposure to free-roaming cats or to known FeLV-infected cats.

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exercise Intolerance & Collapse

  

Exercise Intolerance & Collapse 

 

     Q: My black Lab, Lucky, has been displaying symptoms of I donít know what. After running or hunting, he just lays down and sometimes shakes violently (his whole body). Also, when I touch him I can feel strong muscle spasms. Any prognosis or possible advice would be appreciated. We have been assuming and treating it as a vitamin/iron deficiency (tablets) but so far to no avail.

                                                           - email from Kendra

     A: A syndrome of exercise intolerance and collapse (EIC) is being observed with increasing frequency in young adult Labrador Retrievers. Signs first become apparent in young dogs, between 7 months and 2 years of age. Dogs of either sex and any color can be affected. Littermates and other related dogs are

commonly affected. Dogs with EIC are usually described as being extremely fit, muscular, prime athletic specimens of their breed with an excitable temperament and lots of retrieving drive.

     Affected dogs can tolerate mild to moderate exercise, but after 5 to 15 minutes of strenuous exercise they develop weakness, apparent incoordination, and then collapse. The dogs do not seem to be in pain during the collapse. They are conscious and usually trying to continue exercising. After 10 to 20 minutes of rest, the dogs return to normal. As long as intense exercise, excitement and training stress are avoided, they can live normal lives as pets. Many affected dogs will seem to ďget betterĒ as they age and their activity and excitement levels

naturally diminish. The best treatment in most dogs consists of avoiding intensive exercise in conjunction with extreme excitement and ending exercise at the first hint of weakness or wobbliness. A few dogs have a positive response with a carnitine, CoEnzyme Q, and Riboflavin cocktail or the nutraceutical 7-KETO.

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     As always, we recommend that you check with your veterinarian for your petís immediate health needs and concerns.  

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Puppy Strangles

  

Puppy Strangles

 

     Q: I have a 6 month old Lhaso Apso female dog. At the same time that she went into her first heat she seemed to be sleeping a lot and was not her normal playful self. Later in the day she felt very hot and she had very swollen glands on the right side of her stomach. The glands under her neck were also swollen. She soon had a high fever, was very lethargic, and would not eat. It took three veterinarians to finally diagnose that she had something called ďPuppy Strangles.Ē  Could you tell me more about this? 

- email from NtTPetInfo@aol.com

     A:  Juvenile cellulitis (also known as puppy strangles) is a common disease affecting puppies from 3 weeks to 12 months old. It is most often seen in dachshunds, retrievers, and pointers. It can also affect other littermates.

     The most common sign is an enlargement of the lymph nodes of the neck but skin lesions of the head and neck are usually noticed first. In some cases, fever or a lack of eating is also present.

     Juvenile cellulitis may be fatal if not treated with a course of steroids. Therefore, anyone with a dog that presents these symptoms should visit their veterinarian as soon as possible to begin treatment.

~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~ 

     As always, we recommend that you check with your veterinarian for your petís immediate health needs and concerns.  

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ask Our Vet

  

 

To ask Dr. Neary a question about your pet or any other pet and animal-related topic, please email her at NtTAskOurVet@aol.com

 

 

 

 

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